The unalienable rights that are mentioned in the Declaration of Independence could just as well have been inalienable, which means the same thing. As adjectives the difference between inalienable and alienable is that inalienable is incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred to another; not alienable while alienable is capable of being alienated, sold, or transferred to another; as, land is alienable according to the laws of the state. It was only when John Adams made a copy in his own handwriting that “unalienable” first appeared. I should have known better, having listened to you for many tens of hours, that you not only say what you mean but say it … I’m going to read your text a few more time to “drink in” the full essence of what you’re saying. Inalienable is an antonym of alienable. This is because the spelling ‘inalienable’ appears in other drafts of the Declaration of Independence, including Thomas Jefferson’s original draft . See more. Inalienable or unalienable refers to that which cannot be given away or taken away. I, too, have noted the use and misuse of “unalienable” vs. “inalienable”. Inalienable definition is - incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred. Alienable is an antonym of inalienable. The main claim The universals of form-function relationship in alienability contrasts should not be explained in terms of iconic motivation, as in Haiman's (1983) influential paper, but by economic motivation and … Did You Know? How to use inalienable in a sentence. Here is a listing of known versions … Alienable vs. inalienable possessive constructions 1. 3. Inalienable definition, not transferable to another or not capable of being taken away or denied; not alienable: inalienable rights, freedoms, and liberties; an inalienable territory; inalienable principles and values. Oddly, though, this controversy could have been avoided. Unalienable vs. Inalienable. Unalienable vs. Inalienable Oddly, though, this controversy could have been avoided. This is because the spelling “inalienable” appears in other drafts of the Declaration of Independence, including Thomas Jefferson’s original draft..