The sense in electricity is from 1755. This page was last edited on 27 September 2020, at 07:13. Characterized by constructiveness or influence for the better. Compare posit. 1520s, originally in grammar, from positive (adj.). [from the 18th c.] Characterized by constructiveness or influence for the better. Sense broadened to "expressed without qualification" (1590s), then, of persons, "confident in opinion" (1660s). Sense of "that which can be affirmed, reality" is from 1610s. pervicax adjective. From pōnō (“ to put, place ”) +‎ -īvus. Favorable, desirable by those interested or invested in that which is being judged. The Historie of the Raigne of King Henry the Seventh, A Discourse of the Contests and Dissensions between the Nobles and the Commons in Athens and Rome, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=positive&oldid=60576558, Requests for review of Welsh translations, Terms with manual transliterations different from the automated ones, Terms with manual transliterations different from the automated ones/ar, Requests for review of Mandarin translations, Requests for review of Swedish translations, Requests for review of Turkish translations, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Latin Translation. and directly from Latin positivus "settled by agreement, positive" (opposed to naturalis "natural"), from positus, past participle of ponere "put, place" (see position (n.)). ; Fully assured in opinion. confident, bold, undaunted, audacious, trustful. (mathematics) Of number, greater than zero. How to say be positive in Latin. positīvus (feminine positīva, neuter positīvum); first/second-declensio… More Latin words for positive. From Old French positif, from Latin positivus, from the past participle stem of ponere (“to place”). Gorgeous Latin Words and Phrases About Love. The meaning "possessing definite characters of its own" is by 1610s. early 14c., originally a legal term meaning "formally laid down, decreed or legislated by authority" (opposed to natural ), from Old French positif (13c.) The mathematical use for "greater than zero" is by 1704. Stated definitively and without qualification. stubborn, persistent, obstinate, dogged, unyielding. Something having a positive value in physics, such as an electric charge. Latin Etymology . positive (comparative more positive, superlative most positive), Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, stated definitively and without qualification, physics: having more protons than electrons, derived from an object by itself; absolute, characterised by the existence rather than absence of qualities or features, characterised by features which support a hypothesis, photography: of a visual image true to the original, New Age jargon: good, desirable, healthful, pleasant, enjoyable, the positive degree of adjectives and adverbs, absolute definite natural masculine form of. These romantic sayings are perfect for wedding vows, tattoos, and more. positive (adj.) positive. Psychological sense of "concentrating on what is constructive and good" is recorded from 1916. Positive words, that he would not bear arms against King Edward’s son. indicating existence or presence of a suspected condition or pathogen, reckoned, situated or tending in the direction which naturally or arbitrarily is taken to indicate increase or progress or onward motion, the primary form of an adjective or adverb, denotes a quality without qualification, comparison, or relation to increase or diminution, a film showing a photographic image whose tones correspond to those of the original subject. early 14c., originally a legal term meaning "formally laid down, decreed or legislated by authority" (opposed to natural),  from Old French positif (13c.) Meaning in philosophy of "dealing only with facts" is from 1590s. Derived from an object by itself; not dependent on changing circumstances or relations; absolute. Characterized by the existence or presence of distinguishing qualities or features, rather than by their absence. Latin Translation. and directly from Latin positivus "settled by agreement, positive" (opposed to naturalis "natural"), from positus, past participle of ponere "put, place" (see position (n.)). Pronunciation IPA : /po.siˈtiː.wus/, [pɔ.sɪˈt̪iː.wʊs] (Ecclesiastical) IPA : /po.siˈti.vus/, [pɔ.ziˈt̪iː.vus] Adjective . Characterized by the presence of features which support a hypothesis. Sense in photography (opposite of negative (n.)) is by 1853. characterized by or displaying affirmation or acceptance or certainty etc. Unsurprisingly, the Latin language has a number of wonderful expressions that share the wisdom of ages past on this subject. confidens adjective. The sense of "absolute" is from mid-15c. [from the 17th c.] I’m absolutely positive you've spelt that wrong. positivae Find more words! The Latin word for love is "amare," and there are few topics more beautiful than love. A thing capable of being affirmed; something real or actual. Positive thinking is attested from 1953. If an adjective ends in -er for its masculine singular nominative in what is called the "positive" (e.g., for the Latin adjective pulcher 'beautiful,' pulcher is the positive form), its superlative form will end in -errimus, -a, -um.